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If you don’t want to rattle can it with nightshade or anything like that and want a finish that will last, you will probably have to get it chrome dipped at a custom shop.

When I lived in Colorado Springs, Colorado there was a shop named Grizzlies customs that did chrome dipping and could tint the chrome any color you want. What the difference is between chrome dip and chrome plate, I don’t know. I only know that there’s not a lot of shops that do actual chrome plating. From what Ive been told it requires some pretty nasty chemicals and special (read expensive) facilities to do it.
I worked in the electroplating department at Tektronix for a summer as an engineering intern. We did a lot of chrome plating (hard chrome plating) and nickel/chrome plating (decorative chrome plating) as well as other metals including gold. Chrome is always applied by electroplating so there's no difference between plating or dipping. They refer to the same process. Chromium trioxide (CrO3) is used as a source of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6 ions) in the plating bath plus sulfuric acid. Lead is used for the anode while the part to be plated is the cathode. The bath temperature is controlled as well as the current density to optimize the deposition.

This is an extremely toxic process using corrosive acids (chromic and sulfuric). Hexavalent chromium is the most toxic form of chromium as it is regulated by the EPA as a human carcinogen. The plating process also produces lead chromates which are toxic. Ventilation and wet-scrubbing systems are used to recover the hexavalent chromium and the water is treated to precipitate the chromium out of the water before it is discharged.

This process is inherently dangerous and as a result, you don't see many mom and pop plating shops. It's an expensive process with lots of regulations to prevent exposure to humans.
 

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Thank you for sharing! I’ve been really fascinated by etching and plating lately, so I’d love to hear more about the process. But as that would be a derail/hijack, I won’t directly ask lol
I worked in the electroplating lab under the corporate chemist. One of my responsibilities was to dissolve gold salts in a solution and add that to the gold plating baths. Gold was only about $150/oz. back in 74 but I was still transporting about $40,000 worth of gold in an open-top SS container down from the lab to the plating baths. I was paranoid about tripping and spilling the gold while going down the stairs to the baths. The baths themselves were locked and integrators were on the electrical current supplies to monitor and prevent gold from "disappearing". I still was able to take an Eisenhower dollar coin and plate it with 24K gold while I worked there. I still have that coin.
 

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I worked in the electroplating lab under the corporate chemist. One of my responsibilities was to dissolve gold salts in a solution and add that to the gold plating baths. Gold was only about $150/oz. back in 74 but I was still transporting about $40,000 worth of gold in an open-top SS container down from the lab to the plating baths. I was paranoid about tripping and spilling the gold while going down the stairs to the baths. The baths themselves were locked and integrators were on the electrical current supplies to monitor and prevent gold from "disappearing". I still was able to take an Eisenhower dollar coin and plate it with 24K gold while I worked there. I still have that coin.
Coin Currency Money Artifact Nickel


Not much of a collectable. You can buy them for $10 online at the American Mint website. I'll bet mine has more gold though. I left it in the plating bath for quite a while.
 

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You sure that you don't have anymore of that Gold salt left, give the tin man a coating.;)
Back then, they were gold-cyanide salts. Cyanides are lethal so proper handling was paramount. There were separate acid drains and cyanide drains in the lab and elsewhere in the building as mixing the two would generate hydrogen cyanide gas. There were cyanide poisoning stations in the lab and elsewhere in the building that contained auto-injectors of atropine that you were supposed to jab into your thigh if exposed to cyanide. Fun place to work.
 
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Hope you were well protected, and don't have any issues with your health.:eek:
I'm still alive after working there 48 years ago.
 

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