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Nice. Maybe we'll see some customers asking to have their chestnuts bronzed.
 
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I gotta tell ya, I sorta feel the same about the Malbec black too. It's almost just as hard to keep clean as a normal black, but you gain a very Infiniti specific paint that you don't see very often..
 

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Every car has orange peel these days, some are just worse than others. I thought it was interesting to note that the "scratch shield" paint was listed as standard on that leaked Canadian build list. Someone at the dealer said Infiniti discontinued that type of coating because it sorta died after 2 years.
 

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Holy orange peel! What can be done to smooth it out? Can a detailer fix the orange peel?
Nope. Orange peel happens as a result of the paint being applied unevenly beneath the clear coat. Just about every car has some degree of orange peel these days due to painting techniques and other variables. The clear coat is the top layer which is generally glassy smooth, or will be once you clay bar it and wax/polish it.

Alot of things cause orange peel and the urethane-based paints everyone uses now is the main culprit. Urethane-based paints are nice for the fact that they stay flexible and thus don't chip on impact as easily, and when sprayed on plastics, tend to deform with the plastic and recover nicely rather than bust off in big chunks. Most plastics use flexible urethane coatings while harder compounds may be used on metal parts.

This is a pretty ugly example of it though, and I hope production models don't look that bad up close.
 

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Nope. Orange peel happens as a result of the paint being applied unevenly beneath the clear coat. Just about every car has some degree of orange peel these days due to painting techniques and other variables. The clear coat is the top layer which is generally glassy smooth, or will be once you clay bar it and wax/polish it.

Alot of things cause orange peel and the urethane-based paints everyone uses now is the main culprit. Urethane-based paints are nice for the fact that they stay flexible and thus don't chip on impact as easily, and when sprayed on plastics, tend to deform with the plastic and recover nicely rather than bust off in big chunks. Most plastics use flexible urethane coatings while harder compounds may be used on metal parts.

This is a pretty ugly example of it though, and I hope production models don't look that bad up close.
Thank you for the excellent answer!
 

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