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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an early-model 3.0t (Fall 2016) that’s getting both turbos replaced at 38k miles. From what I’ve read lurking around here for the last year or so, that seems to be a pretty common occurrence, but I haven’t been able to find much follow-up from owners who have actually gone through it. That being said, I’m wondering:

Has anyone here noticed a difference (good or bad) in the way your car feels before and after getting a turbo(s) replaced?

For context, I drive a Premium (300hp), but I’d be curious to here back from Red Sport owners about their experiences as well.

Thanks for the input! — UA
 

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2021 Q50 RedSport, MBRP Cat-Back. HKS BOV, AMS LDP, Mishimoto Catch Can
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I spoke with our service side out of curiosity and according to them, the replacement turbos are the new ones being used in the later models unless a dealership happens to have old stock, which is most likely not the case. They have replaced turbos here quite a few times and have only had one issue, the brilliant guy left his JB4 on the car when he brought it back in lol as long as you don't abuse them then you should be fine
 

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I must have been the unlucky guy who had two "new ones" as replacements and both started to make noises within 5k - one with high RPMs and the other at lower RPMs (very noticeable.) This prompted me to buy my own Pure Stage 2's vs going with yet another pair of OEMs. As for driving differences between the original 2016-17 turbos and the "new ones" - nothing other than the noises they started to make...

Now as for driving differences between the OEMs and Pure Stage 2's - that's an entirely different discussion altogether :cool:
 

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I must have been the unlucky guy who had two "new ones" as replacements and both started to make noises within 5k - one with high RPMs and the other at lower RPMs (very noticeable.) This prompted me to buy my own Pure Stage 2's vs going with yet another pair of OEMs. As for driving differences between the original 2016-17 turbos and the "new ones" - nothing other than the noises they started to make...

Now as for driving differences between the OEMs and Pure Stage 2's - that's an entirely different discussion altogether :cool:
I haven't spent much time looking at dynos for the Pure Stage 2 turbos but my impression is they definitely have a lot more power at higher RPM's but not as much improvement down low? How do they feel compared to stock turbos at more normal driving. Do you have any noticeable turbo lag? If my turbos do go out someday, I am guessing I will want to replace them with the Pure Stage 2's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I spoke with our service side out of curiosity and according to them, the replacement turbos are the new ones being used in the later models unless a dealership happens to have old stock, which is most likely not the case. They have replaced turbos here quite a few times and have only had one issue, the brilliant guy left his JB4 on the car when he brought it back in lol as long as you don't abuse them then you should be fine
I didn’t realize the refreshed Qs used different turbos. I suppose then the better question would be: is there a noticeable difference between how a 2016 model and a 2020+ model drive in terms of throttle response, turbo timing, etc?
 

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2021 Q50 RedSport, MBRP Cat-Back. HKS BOV, AMS LDP, Mishimoto Catch Can
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To the best of my knowledge, no, there's a ton of people on this Forum that can answer that much better than I can however so hopefully they chime in. Your car should be fine though, just make sure you let the car get warmed up before you punch it and let it sit a minute after pushing it hard as well.
 

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Having test driven both models, I will have to say that the 2016 sport 300hp just feels way faster than the 2020 sport 300. It even sounds alot better when revving somewhat similar to a VQ engine but I cant say that at all for 2020 300hp engine. So I definitely believe they mustve made some big changes to have that much of a difference. Especially the last loaner I had was a 3.0T 300HP and when I was driving it back home I thought it was a 2.0T with amount of power that was being output. To my surprise it was a 3.0T and I was surprised it lacked power. But I will not say that about a 2016, those engines for some reason are way different.
 

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I haven't spent much time looking at dynos for the Pure Stage 2 turbos but my impression is they definitely have a lot more power at higher RPM's but not as much improvement down low? How do they feel compared to stock turbos at more normal driving. Do you have any noticeable turbo lag? If my turbos do go out someday, I am guessing I will want to replace them with the Pure Stage 2's.
I was not able to get the car on a dyno to see the numbers - lost the engine - however before that my butt dyno definitely felt a massive delta on the top end (honestly a bit unnerving the first couple of times as I was not prepared for this car to be so eager to accelerate at those speeds - 20+ psi and the corresponding tune is a thrill.) As for low-end lag - I wish I could say I noticed a difference, however, I was motivated by DDNSPIDER to get a Dragy and start looking at times vs dyno numbers. Once I get the Stage 2's and CFDPs swapped out - it is back to having fun with the car. :cool:
 

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I recently bought a 2017 3.0t, and am having buyers remorse after reading all this bad turbo stuff. Is it inevitable that they will go bad? Mine is out of warranty. I realize it is not known yet, just looking for opinions.
 

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Follow common turbo preservation guidelines - let the engine warm up before WOT pulls and let it cool down after WOT pulls. Keep an eye on your oil and coolant levels. Make sure your OCI is not what the manual says but closer to 3-5k - consider sending in to Blackstone an oil sample to see how the engine / oil is holding up.
 
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am having buyers remorse after reading all this bad turbo stuff...
Just like with any turbocharged engine, you need to maintain the oil, which is critical to the life expectancy of the engine AND turbocharger.

Recommendations:
  • 5k mile OCIs (that's for both oil & filter change intervals)
  • Check the oil level periodically (at least every few weeks) and maintain at a full level, as needed (although frequent top-ups should be a concern)
  • Use a good quality synthetic oil (0W20 or 5W30, based on your Q's operating environment) - I use Valvoline Modern Engine 5W30, which is formulated with dispersants to handle soot in the oil, which can effect seal life
  • Oil sampling to monitor engine wear conditions
  • Limit engine rpms/turbo boost until oil temps have at least become warm (i.e., > 140 deg F)
  • Limit turbo boost prior to engine shut-down to prevent heat soak of turbo seals
If you are concerned about your turbos, a visual check of the compressor outlets (for obvious oil vapor) will give some hint as to the condition of the turbos. In addition, aside from the typical 15-20 sec cold start turbo bypass noises, the turbo wastegates should not rattle during operation, and no visual smoke from the exhaust (aside from condensation burning off after a cold start).
 

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I understand that turbo charged cars need extra attention paid to maintenance and how you drive. I was wondering if anyone (besides Nissan) knows the reasons for these failures. I have had turbos in the past with well over 100k on them without issues. Are failures more common in the 400 hp versions? Is it a back pressure issue that could be mitigated with a couple of blow-off valves? Who supplied these to Nissan? I assume it is a large turbo manufacturer.
Where can I inspect the compressor outlets? From below? Thanks.
 

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Are failures more common in the 400 hp versions?
No, turbo failures happen on stock-tuned 300-hp VR30s. Note: The 400-hp VR30s have an optical sensor on the turbos to limit their speed to something like 240k rpms, which causes the wastegates to open, limiting over-boost.

Is it a back pressure issue that could be mitigated with a couple of blow-off valves?
The back-pressure from abrupt throttle closure is a secondary concern, as at least with Ecutek tuning, the throttle plate closure rate is changed to prevent boost spikes on the compressor outlet. There's nothing inherently wrong with adding BOVs to a VR30 with an automatic transmission, but the debate is whether including BOVs results in increasing turbo life.

Who supplied these to Nissan? I assume it is a large turbo manufacturer.
Honeywell-Garrett

Where can I inspect the compressor outlets? From below? Thanks.
You'll need to loosen the coupler clamps between the compressor outlet and the intercooler inlet. This coupler is where the non-recirculating BOVs are T'd off and installed. You'll also need to loosen the coupler from the IC outlet to TB Inlet, to give you flexibility to move the IC up off its mounts to access the compressor outlets.

For reference, I included a DIY on the TurboSmart BOV installation here, which will show pics of the couplers mentioned above:

DIY CZP TurboSmart BOV Installation
 
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Thanks so much for taking the time to answer my questions.

So, are you suggesting that maybe an EcuTek tune may possibly help slow the wear and tear on the 300 hp turbos?
 

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So, are you suggesting that maybe an EcuTek tune may possibly help slow the wear and tear on the 300 hp turbos?
The Ecutek tune employs a few more safeguards than the stock tune to balance against allowing higher boost levels. That said, a "reliable" tune is part S/W, but also part tuner. A bad tuner can put your turbos and engine in harms way if the boost levels aren't managed appropriately within the fueling and timing tables, for example.

I would suggest if you decide to tune, to do your research and pick a tuner with VR30 experience. As for the turbo life, oil maintenance and ownership habits will go a long way towards avoiding problems. I've had my '17 Q60 AWD Red Sport (new) since December 2016, and I broke it in via the Owner's Manual recommendations. It's had a JB4 Piggyback Boost Controller since 2017, and then I upgraded to an Ecutek tune by SpecialtyZ in Sept 2018. The JB4 was then removed and sold to another forum member.

With just over 29k miles on the clock, the Ecutek tune has been on-board for about 15k miles. What I find with the Ecutek tune is the engine makes so much torque in the lower rpms, it's very infrequent that my engine revs over 5k rpms during the daily drive, as I tend to drive around in manual mode, either using the console shifter or the paddles, which are included on the Sport and Red Sport models. Regardless, I can hit 60 mph pretty quick w/o high engine revs.
 

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The Ecutek tune employs a few more safeguards than the stock tune to balance against allowing higher boost levels. That said, a "reliable" tune is part S/W, but also part tuner. A bad tuner can put your turbos and engine in harms way if the boost levels aren't managed appropriately within the fueling and timing tables, for example.

I would suggest if you decide to tune, to do your research and pick a tuner with VR30 experience. As for the turbo life, oil maintenance and ownership habits will go a long way towards avoiding problems. I've had my '17 Q60 AWD Red Sport (new) since December 2016, and I broke it in via the Owner's Manual recommendations. It's had a JB4 Piggyback Boost Controller since 2017, and then I upgraded to an Ecutek tune by SpecialtyZ in Sept 2018. The JB4 was then removed and sold to another forum member.

With just over 29k miles on the clock, the Ecutek tune has been on-board for about 15k miles. What I find with the Ecutek tune is the engine makes so much torque in the lower rpms, it's very infrequent that my engine revs over 5k rpms during the daily drive, as I tend to drive around in manual mode, either using the console shifter or the paddles, which are included on the Sport and Red Sport models. Regardless, I can hit 60 mph pretty quick w/o high engine revs.
I have heard great things about @goracebox, tons of cars tuned with them which means lots of experience.
 

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I didn’t notice much of a difference when they were replaced on my car.

At the time, the dealer performed a 4 wheel alignment which made the overall drive feel smoother.
 

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Those that have had their turbo replaced, I'm getting a whistle sound when I accelerated from 40-60ish KMs/hr recently now. I'm not sure if its the turbos or the water pump or belt needs aligning. I have 2 months left till warranty is over....
 
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Those that have had their turbo replaced, I'm getting a whistle sound when I accelerated from 40-60ish KMs/hr recently now. I'm not sure if its the turbos or the water pump or belt needs aligning. I have 2 months left till warranty is over....
You should get that checked out as soon as possible. If it’s audible throughout every drive, they will catch it.
 

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You should get that checked out as soon as possible. If it’s audible throughout every drive, they will catch it.
I'll monitor it this week, I started noticing it when the highway was empty and it was during out extreme heat wave week where the temps were +38. I originally thought maybe its the belt, as my water pump was replaced already last year and the belt was replaced as well.
 
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