Infiniti Q50 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 78 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I could not find an option for a limited slip differential on a Q50 Sport. This was a very important option for me on my 2009 G37S coupe. Will a limited slip differential be available?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
432 Posts
I had no idea that the G37 coupe had a LSD on it...so, if that's the case..

My best guess is that it'll likely be on the Q60 coupe like it was before.
In order to have he LSD you needed to have opted for the sport package ... It came with the Viscous limited slip diff... It should still be avail on the Q I did not see any mention of a deletion...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
I think it's crazy that LSD's are still optional, they should become standard. RWD vehicles without LSD's are such a piss off especially if your the type of person that just wants a better driving experience.

Since Infiniti is trying to make themselves more of a premium sport/luxury brand should make LSD standard on all vehicles, expect future vehicles that underpin the Q50.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Important feature

HudsonWasp, I'm glad you brought this up. I'm about to pre-order a Q50 Sport RWD and if the car doesn't have a limited slip differential I may rethink the order. I made the mistake of assuming, and that's gotten me into trouble more times than I can count.

I've owned a 2005 G35 6MT with limited slip and a 2009 G37s with limited slip. Having driven non-Sport or non-6MT G35/G37 service loaners from my dealer -- cars that did not come with limited slip -- I would agree the differential transforms the car from being excessively loose in the rear to a much more predictable, fun and safe vehicle.

Heck, a number of years ago my wife bought a FWD G20 Sport. Even its little 140-horsepower SR20DE engine got blessed with a limited slip differential, making that car maybe the slowest vehicle ever made with a VLSD. And many, many years ago my 1991 Sentra SE-R had one too.

I am checking with my dealer now to see if they have any information on this. Previously, Infiniti dropped in a limited slip rear with the Sport or 6MT package. But nowhere on the Q50 microsite do I see anything about a limited slip differential.

To the dealer folks on this forum: Do you have any information on the subject? It's a big deal. RWD cars with 330 horsepower that are designed to be driven aggressively need it. Period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
CFRP, it's a viscous limited-slip differential on the G35 / G37 sedans and coupes.

Regarding the pre-order: It's a $500 refundable deposit to get the car I want ordered the way I want it. If the seats are too tight, or the color is wrong, or the wheels are too dark, or the wheel gap is too wide (a distinct possibility based on some of the photos I've seen), or the electric steering is too numb and / or splays the front wheels in opposite directions on the test drive... you get the idea.

And if I happen to love the car, it's right there. Price is already negotiated. I'll take it! So for me there's really nothing to lose.

Unless they monumentally screw up the Q, it'll be the fourth G that's run through our family. I love these cars. BMW, Audi and Cadillac keep trying to lure me in, but after each test drive I seem to find my way back to the Infiniti dealer. I have no idea what's wrong with me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,661 Posts
CFRP, it's a viscous limited-slip differential on the G35 / G37 sedans and coupes..
You're right. The VLSD is added to all G37 sedans and coupes as part of the Sport Package (RWD only) and is standard on the G37S MT.



Regarding the pre-order: It's a $500 refundable deposit to get the car I want ordered the way I want it. If the seats are too tight, or the color is wrong, or the wheels are too dark, or the wheel gap is too wide (a distinct possibility based on some of the photos I've seen), or the electric steering is too numb and / or splays the front wheels in opposite directions on the test drive... you get the idea.

And if I happen to love the car, it's right there. Price is already negotiated. I'll take it! So for me there's really nothing to lose.

Unless they monumentally screw up the Q, it'll be the fourth G that's run through our family. I love these cars. BMW, Audi and Cadillac keep trying to lure me in, but after each test drive I seem to find my way back to the Infiniti dealer. I have no idea what's wrong with me.
Thanks for providing your perspective on this. With this being your 4th G/Q50, I'm sure you'll love it. I hope everything works out and hopefully you'll be around when you take delivery and post some wonderful photos!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Viscous Limited Slip Differential

JK is right on in his analysis of the limited slip differential, and its necessiity in a car that is designed to be driven aggressively. I have driven a number of cars recently that do not have LSD and when you move back and fourth between a LSD and an open differential, the difference is very noticeable. All the cars that I have purchased since 1983 have had a LSD.
One does not even have to be driving particullarly aggressively - a typical freeway onramp quickly exposes the difference. Although the VLSD is not as agressive as many of the clutch type or Torsen units, it makes driving a RWD passanger car a much more pleasant experience. The electric power steering is another matter. I refused a Lexus a few years back because of its "Game Boy" steering. I just drove a Cadillac ATS with the ZF unit, and it is much better than others that I have driven. I hope Infiniti deals effectively with this issue that is common with the electric units.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
157 Posts
I was pretty against electric steering when everyone switched over. Since then I have driven some very well tuned electric systems. But you can really mess one up badly.. I still love how hydraulic feels.
Yeah as nice as an electric steering system can be, it just isn't the best thing if you want a true driving experience, meaning you want to feel as engaged with the car as possible.

Good example of thing being done in the industry is in the new Bentley Mulsanne, even as a 2013 model vehicle priced at 1/4 million dollars it has a rack and pinion power steering setup. I thought this was stupid and that an electric steering system would be better, but I was reminded at how much of a driver focused brand Bentley is and it made sense.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,661 Posts
Hmm, I just remembered/noticed that the Cadillac ATS has a true LSD on it.

When I test drove the ATS--I think compared to the G37, the ATS V6 is a tad clip slower, it's smaller on the inside, and has a fussier control system, however it had a smoother and more controlled ride on rough road, and the suspension and ride control were **** impressive in corners.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,661 Posts
Yes it does. Please do not remind me. If the car weren't such a shrunken, slowish little turd with GM's interpretation of how to build MyFord Touch, but worse, I might have considered it just for the differential. :D
Aww, and I thought I was harsh.... :eek:

I've never tried the MyFord Touch, but the CUE system--as I mentioned in my review, it's an OK system if you're willing to put up with its quirks for a few months while you get used to it. I was a bit more surprised that it wasn't as terrible as I thought it would be.

I actually would seriously consider an ATS if I wasn't so lazy to learning a brand new tech system. :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,692 Posts
Yeah as nice as an electric steering system can be, it just isn't the best thing if you want a true driving experience, meaning you want to feel as engaged with the car as possible.

Good example of thing being done in the industry is in the new Bentley Mulsanne, even as a 2013 model vehicle priced at 1/4 million dollars it has a rack and pinion power steering setup. I thought this was stupid and that an electric steering system would be better, but I was reminded at how much of a driver focused brand Bentley is and it made sense.
The customization aspect is what will be great about the electric steering. Sharpen it up or loosen it up depending on your mood, the terrain, etc. You can adjust turns lock-to-lock and effort independently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
... but the CUE system--as I mentioned in my review, it's an OK system if you're willing to put up with its quirks for a few months while you get used to it. :p
The CUE in the ATS I looked at was dog-slow, and that little haptic interface that senses your impending touch is just a terrible idea. My wife's Honda has a simple touch-screen navigation / multimedia system, and I can't count the number of times I've hit a small bump or transition in the road while reaching toward an onscreen "button," only to whack the one next to it by mistake. Doing the same in the CUE will be geometrically more frustrating because it has the potential to happen much more often as the system attempts to sense where your finger is headed as the car is moving you -- and more importantly, your pointing finger -- all over the place in the cabin.

Technology just for the sake of technology is always a bad idea. It is a doubly bad idea in a car.

Plus, the car is six inches shorter than the Q, itself not exactly a limousine. Stubby little thing. Sort of embarrassing in size, really.

On the plus side, the ATS handles brilliantly. I mean, brilliantly. I am amazed GM made that car. Is this the same company that not too long ago made Rivieras and Park Places and DeVilles that sort of floated around with dampers that only damped in the sense they kept the body from flying off the suspension mounts?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,661 Posts
Plus, the car is six inches shorter than the Q, itself not exactly a limousine. Stubby little thing. Sort of embarrassing in size, really.
Wow,...that's extremely moot.

I mean a car's size is objectively for the driver to decide if it suits their needs. I thought its proportions looked fine, even if it's smaller than the Q50.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Wow [your comment on the relative smallness of the ATS]...that's extremely moot...
I mean a car's size is objectively for the driver to decide if it suits their needs.
Of course. But I'll never understand why manufacturers build premium four-door sedans with backseats usable only by midgets and small children. The Sentra has a HUGE backseat in comparison to the ATS. And even if it didn't, I wouldn't mark it off because it is a $16K econobox. But a tiny Cadillac sedan? They'll sell a bunch to rich college girls and real estate ladies. Many men will turn their noses up and head over to the CTS.

You ever sit in the back of the current (not upcoming) IS, which is comparable in size to the ATS? My wife test-drove one of those four years ago, and it was a ridiculous scene. I am not a big guy at 6'0" but even with the driver's seat adjusted for her petite 5'4" frame, I could not fit behind her without my legs splayed comically. (That sounds bad. Get your minds out of the gutter!)

The ATS was only marginally better.

Small sedans are cool. Small coupes are even cooler. But $45K entry-luxury performance four-door sedans with basically unusable back seats seem pointless, IMO -- particularly one built in America for American tastes by a company known for selling land yachts. Keep your market in mind, Cadillac.

Nonetheless, to each his own. At least the people who buy the ATS won't have to worry about driving more than one coworker to lunch, and being the carpool guy is out of the question. Now if and when an ATS coupe arrives: That's a car that will make sense.
 
1 - 20 of 78 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top