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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, just picked up a new 2018 Q50 Red Sport last Friday. Just looking for some general tips and knowledge that others have learnt about maintaining their Q50's. I'm in Calgary AB and wondering if anyone has any fuel recommends. The owners manual recommends 93 rating but I don't know if I have ever seen a gas station around here with 93, mostly just 91. Looking to get a little bit into mods down the road and wondering if anyone has a recommendation as to where to start. Also just looking any general maintenance tips people may have. This is my first new car and the first one I really care about and want to baby and make sure I take good care of. Thanks in advance!
 

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Welcome fellow Cunacky, if 93 is not available for you use ,91, take your time and learn a bit about the car, you will have plenty of time for modding, here in Toronto we have 93-94 octane, I'm sure you may get some help from fellow Calgerian,(bigheadclan).
 

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Welcome. Congrats on the new car.
 

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Hi all, just picked up a new 2018 Q50 Red Sport last Friday. Just looking for some general tips and knowledge that others have learnt about maintaining their Q50's. I'm in Calgary AB and wondering if anyone has any fuel recommends. The owners manual recommends 93 rating but I don't know if I have ever seen a gas station around here with 93, mostly just 91. Looking to get a little bit into mods down the road and wondering if anyone has a recommendation as to where to start. Also just looking any general maintenance tips people may have. This is my first new car and the first one I really care about and want to baby and make sure I take good care of. Thanks in advance!
Welcome fellow Calgarian, in terms of fuel 91 octane will do fine Nissan engines in particular like Shell gas (0% eth content) but you're right 93 is pretty rare in our city. Husky or Petro-Can stations
are probably your best bet if your looking for higher octane.

The Petro-Can on 8 Ave & 19 St NE has 94 but I think it's just 91 octane + booster which you could honestly just do yourself for cheaper.


Welcome fellow Cunacky, if 93 is not available for you use ,91, take your time and learn a bit about the car, you will have plenty of time for modding, here in Toronto we have 93-94 octane, I'm sure you may get some help from fellow Calgerian,(bigheadclan).
Ehhh I'd say Canuks would be for the people out of Vancouver but Calgary also has a rugby club that uses the name..... So I guess it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the heads up. I will stick with she'll then as that is what I run in my 2010 Maxima and have never had any issues. I've never used the Petro Can's much but I have heard bad things about their fuel. Do you know much about Centex fuel? I believe they carry 91 and they drop their fuel prices every other day of the week it seems. It would be a nice option as I have found the car to be a bit thirsty so far, but that also might be my driving habits with the power of the car lol.
 

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Thanks for the heads up. I will stick with she'll then as that is what I run in my 2010 Maxima and have never had any issues. I've never used the Petro Can's much but I have heard bad things about their fuel. Do you know much about Centex fuel? I believe they carry 91 and they drop their fuel prices every other day of the week it seems. It would be a nice option as I have found the car to be a bit thirsty so far, but that also might be my driving habits with the power of the car lol.
I'd stay away from Centex, I don't use their stations myself but I've heard nothing good about them. They had some bad fuel in one of their Alberta locations due to poor construction of a fuel tank two years ago and it ended up causing major issues for hundreds of people who filled up at that location. There is some pretty rigorous testing, validation and inspections for those Storage tanks so it's likely
they cut corners to get a new tank installed.

Not to mention they are a independent which means they buy surplus or bottom of the barrel product that just makes minimum standards. And while modern fuel is pretty good
compared to 10-15 years ago you never know what blend of fuel/additives are going into your tank.

Some locations are fine such as Costco but the wait in line can be brutal, but they at least buy from only a small handful of top-tier suppliers.
CO-OP Fuel is also decent if you are in a pinch as they own their own refinery, but they cost the same as Shell more often than not so no real benefit there.

Personally I'd stick with Shell 91 as the Infiniti manual recommends you stay away from aftermarket additives, Eth blends and octane boosters.
If you want to try a Octane booster just make sure it doesn't contain MMT (methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl) as Infiniti advises against
that in the manual.
@Avedis53 can get into the nitty gritty of chemical composition of additives if you really want to learn more.
 

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I don't think the OP wants to be bored with the chemistry of why MMT is bad for DI engines. Just stay away from octane boosters in general and use top tier fuels and you'll be ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I actually am kind of interested in the chemistry. I read the part in the manual that says to stay away from the boosters and didn't have any plans on using anything like that. I'm not necessarily looking for top performance at this point in owning the car. Maybe down the road when the warranties are up I'll look into engine tuners and the such.
Anyway I actually working in auto insurance claims and am dealing with damaged cars all day. I know a fair amount body work and repairs but my mechanical knowledge is still lacking, that's why I am kind of interest in the chemistry. So if you felt like taking the time to share I don't mind at all.
 

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<Reading glasses and popcorn emoji>
 

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I was looking for the topic, that we talked about the different types of gas, and Avadis53, explained very nicely.
 

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I was looking for the topic, that we talked about the different types of gas, and Avadis53, explained very nicely.
I think that was discussing fuel additives specifically, but it's hard to track down specific topics like that sometimes. We get so far off topic sometimes. Hah
 

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I tried, like John said, if Avadis53 is up to the task, go for it.
ACK!...I'm not about to regurgitate those posts from memory. I'll find them and post them later. We're having our granddaughter's 3rd birthday party today so I need to go do some things around here first.

Here's one I wrote on fuel injector cleaners and using ETOH blends > 50%.

As a chemical engineer, I have a somewhat skeptical viewpoint concerning fuel system cleaners. There use to be some pretty aggressive cleaners used to clean injectors like Dimethoxymethane (Methylal) that worked well but the EPA banned that years ago. The cleaners available these days are at best, minimally effective and their claims of improving mileage and power are exaggerated.

I've driven fuel-injected cars for many years and haven't had injector problems. However, I live in the NW where E85 gas is virtually non-existent and 10% ethanol mixtures are the standard. I use top-tier premium gas and have never used a fuel system cleaner.

Those of you who use E85 in your car or mix your gas with E85 are more susceptible to injector fouling thanks to the EPA mandate that require polyisobutylene be added as a detergent to all gas except racing fuel. It works well in gas but in gas/ethanol blends over 50%, the polyisobutylene reacts with the ethanol over time to form a fairly insoluble deposit in the gas tank and on injector walls. The EPA has known about this for years yet they won't change the mandate. The highest concentration of ethanol in gas tested that did not form these deposits is 15% ethanol.

Once the detergent precipitates out of the gas/ethanol mixture, it is not readily dissolved by E85 or pump gas. Depending on how bad the fouling is, some fuel cleaners can be beneficial at dissolving the deposits and restoring the injectors but pulling the injectors and ultrasonically cleaning them is a much better fix if the problem is substantial. It's just not as convenient as pouring a can of cleaner in your gas tank on a routine basis. Unfortunately, it's simply not as effective as properly cleaning injectors either.

A gasoline flush is recommended as an alternative to fuel cleaners also. This involves running the gas tank near empty (not just fuel gauge empty) of the E85 or mix and then run a couple tanks of top-tier gas like Shell V-Power through the engine. Doing this every 6-8,000 miles should clean the injectors and the gas tank for routine driving without plugging your gas filter. If you do mostly highway driving, maybe once every 15 to 20,000 miles as the deposition is more prevalent in city driving. You should avoid adding gas to a tank of E85 if you can avoid it as that can cause deposits to form from the influx of a lot of polyisobutylene and you fuel filter could become plugged. I can't personally speak to the effectiveness of a gasoline flush after using high ethanol mix fuel. Perhaps others here can.

If you mix fuels, simply keep your ethanol concentration below 50% and you should be good as the polyisobutylene won't precipitate out.

Another issue regarding E85 is the formation of many more acids in engines than regular gas, mostly due to the extra oxygen introduced by the combustion of ethanol. Routine oil changes at shorter intervals will help keep the acid concentration low and minimize engine corrosion.

Heading back to the lab now......
 

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Hey Avadis53, your Granddaughter and I have something in common, if it's her Birthday today.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That was awesome and very informative, thank you for taking the time to dig it up. So it sounds like I will just stick with shell 91 which is also convenient as there is one near me. I am slo not going to be be driving it a ton in the winter as my commute is mostly to the train station and back and I don't trust public parking lots. So the car will be sitting for large portions of time periodically through the year and I don't want to increase the chance of that gunk build up you mentioned.

As a side thought I would be interested to know what people's feelings are on using their Infiniti as a daily driver or commuter vehicle, or using it as more of a weekend driver. I always like to hear people's takes on maintaining vehicles and limiting depreciation as opposed to fully enjoying their new car. It's nice to say in 5 years that I only put 30,000 kilometers on the car and it's still in mint shape with no chips, scratches, dings, etc... Or taking the opposite approach and getting the most enjoyment out of the vehicle by driving it ever day and racking up the miles so to speak.
 

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Here's one I wrote on MMT:

I've read that article. Remember that MMT was introduced in 1974 as the replacement for TEL (tetraethyllead) as an octane enhancer/knock retardant since TEL was ordered to be phased out by the EPA in 1973. Engines with catalytic converters would follow shortly thereafter because of the new requirements of the Clean Air Act and TEL was a very effective catalyst poison and had to go.

It doesn't surprise me that the MMT studies were somewhat conflicting. The automobile manufacturer's testing showed that MMT can cause fouling and to no surprise, Ethyl Corp, who manufactures MMT, said their studies showed no harm under typical operating conditions (whatever those were). It just goes to show that depending on how you set up your testing protocols, you can manipulate the results in your favor.

As the technology of catalytic converters advanced, they became more susceptible to poisoning from other elements like sulfur (in fuels), phosphorus and zinc (from engine oil anti-wear additives), manganese (MMT), and even silicon that can come from coolant (silicates) leaking into the combustion chambers. Even though Ethyl Corp. was finally able to get a waiver to allow the use of MMT in unleaded gas by taking the EPA to court, the fuel manufacturers sided with the automobile manufacturers and voluntarily discontinued adding MMT to their fuels.

History aside and getting to your question about using MMT with no cats, obviously, if you have no cats, you can't foul them. However, intake valves on GDI engines are susceptible to MMT fouling as are spark plugs and any sensors that are in the exhaust gas stream. The thermal decomposition of organo-metallic compounds like MMT can and do leave deposits on those parts of the engine and exhaust/emission control systems.

As far as how often one can use MMT products like Torco and avoid fouling problems, I can't answer that. I have to assume the effect is accumulative over time though. The more you use MMT products, the more deposition that can occur. Spark plugs and sensors can be replaced at a minimal cost if the deposition is substantial enough to affect their operation but cleaning intake valves of deposits is obviously a more expensive issue. If you have cats, then their replacement due to fouling can be expensive also.

This is simply my take on MMT so you are certainly free to disagree and rely on Torco's statements that their product won't foul engines. After reviewing the information that is out there, I won't use any organo-metallic octane booster.



And this:

Depending on the contaminant, catalyst poisoning can sometimes be reversed by running the engine under a heavy load for an extended period of time. However lead deposits can't be burned off because of lead's high boiling point. Manganese's boiling point is even higher than lead so it's doubtful it can be burned off either.

This is why I don't like organo-metallic compounds in the high temperature areas of the engine and exhaust/emissions systems.
 

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That was awesome and very informative, thank you for taking the time to dig it up. So it sounds like I will just stick with shell 91 which is also convenient as there is one near me. I am slo not going to be be driving it a ton in the winter as my commute is mostly to the train station and back and I don't trust public parking lots. So the car will be sitting for large portions of time periodically through the year and I don't want to increase the chance of that gunk build up you mentioned.

As a side thought I would be interested to know what people's feelings are on using their Infiniti as a daily driver or commuter vehicle, or using it as more of a weekend driver. I always like to hear people's takes on maintaining vehicles and limiting depreciation as opposed to fully enjoying their new car. It's nice to say in 5 years that I only put 30,000 kilometers on the car and it's still in mint shape with no chips, scratches, dings, etc... Or taking the opposite approach and getting the most enjoyment out of the vehicle by driving it ever day and racking up the miles so to speak.
Mine is a daily driver and I bought it to drive, not to look at in the garage. I'm averaging about 8,500 miles/year (retired) doing mostly highway driving. I don't abuse it much but I do drive it like I stole it when conditions allow. Chips, scratches and dings are part of driving a car and I accept that depreciation is part of the game. Pay to play.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I hope I can over come my fear of getting even the slightest knick on the car. I know it's still only the first week of me owning so I'm not expecting to go out and drive it like a rental but being in my profession I know how much even a small dent costs to fix now a days which has led me to be a bit over protective.
 

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That was awesome and very informative, thank you for taking the time to dig it up. So it sounds like I will just stick with shell 91 which is also convenient as there is one near me. I am slo not going to be be driving it a ton in the winter as my commute is mostly to the train station and back and I don't trust public parking lots. So the car will be sitting for large portions of time periodically through the year and I don't want to increase the chance of that gunk build up you mentioned.

As a side thought I would be interested to know what people's feelings are on using their Infiniti as a daily driver or commuter vehicle, or using it as more of a weekend driver. I always like to hear people's takes on maintaining vehicles and limiting depreciation as opposed to fully enjoying their new car. It's nice to say in 5 years that I only put 30,000 kilometers on the car and it's still in mint shape with no chips, scratches, dings, etc... Or taking the opposite approach and getting the most enjoyment out of the vehicle by driving it ever day and racking up the miles so to speak.
The Q50 is a awesome daily driver. The Q50 is not the car to store in a garage and break out on nice days. As awesome as the Q50 is, they’re never going to build a museum to honor it.

Not sure where you bought it but most Infiniti dealers offer a wheel, tire, ding, key fob and glass chip insurance for around $900 US even for used CPO. Not sure how much in Canada or if they offer it. If you can still purchase it I strongly suggest it. My insurance has already paid for itself.
 

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I hope I can over come my fear of getting even the slightest knick on the car. I know it's still only the first week of me owning so I'm not expecting to go out and drive it like a rental but being in my profession I know how much even a small dent costs to fix now a days which has led me to be a bit over protective.
I hear you. I always try to park away from other cars or in a corner to try to lower the risk of dings. But here in the Midwest the bigger issue is hail damage and that’s really difficult to predict. I’ve had a couple of my cars damaged by hail to the tune of $3000+
But I guess that’s what insurance is there for.
 
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