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I've had 3 different models of tires on my 2018 Q50 AWD 3.0t. I purchased the car slightly used and the previous owner had the Bridgetstone Potenza RA97AS 225/50/18 on it. These tires had good grip but not a comfortable ride and were extremely loud on prettly much any surface. I then moved to the Continental DWS06 245/45/18 mainly due to the kudos this tire gets from the forum. It had slightly better grip than the RA97AS tire and provided a bit more comfort but the road noise was still really bad on rough or broken pavement. Last week I put on the Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack 245/45/18 and to-date are the best tire IMO for this car. Grip and cornering are not as good as the DWS06 though very close and now that I've learned the driving dynamics of the tire I'm able to drive with full confidence. Ride confort is much better and road noice is drastically reduced. Noise is still there on rough & broken pavement particularly at higher speeds (which is realy a fault of the car itself not the tire) though as mentioned is greatly reduced. RWD guys will most likely not like them as you'll probably experience wheelspin. If you're AWD and want as much quiet and comfort as you can get this is the best I've had to-date. And they look good to boot.
90815
 

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So…things change. Taking a not-so-stunning 180 soured on the Quiettracks. I put them on before I added the JB4. Fast forward to now – When I have the JB4 on the nannys kick in if I try to take a corner aggressively. Using Sport mode reduces the nanny effect but it’s still there. If I turn the nannys off the tires spin a lot, RPMs hit the redline quickly and gets a bit outta control even for AWD. Additionally, maybe the Arizona heat has reduced their grip even further (is that a thing?) as it seems worse when it’s 90+ degrees outside. Initially I got used to the less-than-stellar grip but it’s too intrusive now. I had put just shy of 2500 miles on them and with every mile more unhappy. So thank my lucky stars for Discount Tire, where I always buy my tires. I called them just to see what options I had to change tires yet again. It turns out Bridgestone has a 90-day return policy. I was at 87 days. I made an appointment and had the DWS06’s re-installed on day 88 and will live with the occasional road noise until if/when I get some Dynamat installed. With working remote now, I rarely hit that bad stretch of freeway so rethinking the $$ it’ll take to get the sound deadened and may forgo it if remote work becomes permanent 🤞. Placebo effect: I checked decibels riding on both sets of tires at the same part of the freeway where there’s coarse pavement and the road has a lot of horizontal breaks, same speed, no other vehicles around me, same phone and phone DB app. Average DB with the Quiettracks was 78. Average DB with the DWs06’s is…the same at 78. The Quiettracks have a max DB of 82 and the DWS06 a max of 83 which was the only difference, was consistent and appeared at the same really coarse, bad spot on the freeway. Experiencing the placebo effect was interesting. I was sure the QTs were much quieter but in reality they aren’t, at least not on my ride. Anywho…just wanted to update this post in the event someone read it and was going to go the Bridgestone Quiettrack route on their Q…my advice is to not and go with the DWS06 or similar. The best part is I got $240 back as the DWS06s are a bit less per tire. And I got 16lbs back as the DWS06s weigh less.
 

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The Turanzas are definitely a touring tire. I don't believe they proclaim to be anything else. A performance tire will always have a stiffer sidewall and tread. There is nothing that can be all things to all people.

I have found that the Michelin Premiers that I have on my car are a compromise that suits me.
 

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Maybe it isn't the car or the tire, but the subpar road surface.
 

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So…things change. Taking a not-so-stunning 180 soured on the Quiettracks. I put them on before I added the JB4. Fast forward to now – When I have the JB4 on the nannys kick in if I try to take a corner aggressively. Using Sport mode reduces the nanny effect but it’s still there. If I turn the nannys off the tires spin a lot, RPMs hit the redline quickly and gets a bit outta control even for AWD. Additionally, maybe the Arizona heat has reduced their grip even further (is that a thing?) as it seems worse when it’s 90+ degrees outside. Initially I got used to the less-than-stellar grip but it’s too intrusive now. I had put just shy of 2500 miles on them and with every mile more unhappy. So thank my lucky stars for Discount Tire, where I always buy my tires. I called them just to see what options I had to change tires yet again. It turns out Bridgestone has a 90-day return policy. I was at 87 days. I made an appointment and had the DWS06’s re-installed on day 88 and will live with the occasional road noise until if/when I get some Dynamat installed. With working remote now, I rarely hit that bad stretch of freeway so rethinking the $$ it’ll take to get the sound deadened and may forgo it if remote work becomes permanent 🤞. Placebo effect: I checked decibels riding on both sets of tires at the same part of the freeway where there’s coarse pavement and the road has a lot of horizontal breaks, same speed, no other vehicles around me, same phone and phone DB app. Average DB with the Quiettracks was 78. Average DB with the DWs06’s is…the same at 78. The Quiettracks have a max DB of 82 and the DWS06 a max of 83 which was the only difference, was consistent and appeared at the same really coarse, bad spot on the freeway. Experiencing the placebo effect was interesting. I was sure the QTs were much quieter but in reality they aren’t, at least not on my ride. Anywho…just wanted to update this post in the event someone read it and was going to go the Bridgestone Quiettrack route on their Q…my advice is to not and go with the DWS06 or similar. The best part is I got $240 back as the DWS06s are a bit less per tire. And I got 16lbs back as the DWS06s weigh less.
Measure the Continentals on that road again after you've put 500 miles on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Measure the Continentals on that road again after you've put 500 miles on them.
Yep definitely. I did have the DWS06 on for about 250 miles prior to the Quiettracks and noise level stayed the same. I'll test again in 500 miles/1000 miles and post.
 

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Huge fan of the Michelin Pilot Sport as3+ for all season tires.
Excellent tire for all season traction but not best for noise and ride.
 

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So…things change. Taking a not-so-stunning 180 soured on the Quiettracks. I put them on before I added the JB4. Fast forward to now – When I have the JB4 on the nannys kick in if I try to take a corner aggressively. Using Sport mode reduces the nanny effect but it’s still there. If I turn the nannys off the tires spin a lot, RPMs hit the redline quickly and gets a bit outta control even for AWD. Additionally, maybe the Arizona heat has reduced their grip even further (is that a thing?) as it seems worse when it’s 90+ degrees outside. Initially I got used to the less-than-stellar grip but it’s too intrusive now. I had put just shy of 2500 miles on them and with every mile more unhappy. So thank my lucky stars for Discount Tire, where I always buy my tires. I called them just to see what options I had to change tires yet again. It turns out Bridgestone has a 90-day return policy. I was at 87 days. I made an appointment and had the DWS06’s re-installed on day 88 and will live with the occasional road noise until if/when I get some Dynamat installed. With working remote now, I rarely hit that bad stretch of freeway so rethinking the $$ it’ll take to get the sound deadened and may forgo it if remote work becomes permanent 🤞. Placebo effect: I checked decibels riding on both sets of tires at the same part of the freeway where there’s coarse pavement and the road has a lot of horizontal breaks, same speed, no other vehicles around me, same phone and phone DB app. Average DB with the Quiettracks was 78. Average DB with the DWs06’s is…the same at 78. The Quiettracks have a max DB of 82 and the DWS06 a max of 83 which was the only difference, was consistent and appeared at the same really coarse, bad spot on the freeway. Experiencing the placebo effect was interesting. I was sure the QTs were much quieter but in reality they aren’t, at least not on my ride. Anywho…just wanted to update this post in the event someone read it and was going to go the Bridgestone Quiettrack route on their Q…my advice is to not and go with the DWS06 or similar. The best part is I got $240 back as the DWS06s are a bit less per tire. And I got 16lbs back as the DWS06s weigh less.
Yep temperature plays a big role in performance of a tire, once you go above or below the threshold their ability to grip
the road fall off rather quickly.

As for picking up the sound you need to remember the microphone in you're phone is specifically designed to pick up the human voice and filter out anything else beyond 3-4 feet, so it operates within a rather narrow frequency range. So most phones aren't going to picking up on something like tire-noise, which is not only generated outside the car past layers of sound isolation but typically on the lower-end of the spectrum as well.

The DWS06 tires are very likely louder than the QuietTracks you had equipped \.
 
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My DWS06's are fairly loud. They are better than the stock runflats, but not significantly.

I find that folks often pass judgment on noise from tires when comparing a brand new tire to a worn out old tire. That is not a fair comparison. You have to give the new tires 500-1000 miles to settle in to their actual characteristics.
 
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Yep temperature plays a big role in performance of a tire, once you go above or below the threshold their ability to grip
the road fall off rather quickly.

As for picking up the sound you need to remember the microphone in you're phone is specifically designed to pick up the human voice and filter out anything else beyond 3-4 feet, so it operates within a rather narrow frequency range. So most phones aren't going to picking up on something like tire-noise, which is not only generated outside the car past layers of sound isolation but typically on the lower-end of the spectrum as well.

The DWS06 tires are very likely louder than the QuietTracks you had equipped \.
I don't think you're giving the microphone in the iPhone enough credit. Paired with an app like dB Decibel Meter, it is fairly accurate.

The iPhone microphone does not operate in a narrow frequency range. As a omnidirectional MEMS microphone, it has flat frequency response down to 50-60 Hz and then rolls off about 15 dB down to about 30 Hz. It's table-flat up to 10K Hz and depending on the model can remain flat up to about 15K Hz. With the app, the frequency response curve is calibrated with a Nor140 high-precision decibel meter so the low and high end roll-offs are corrected.

A sound level mic should handle some fairly loud sounds without compressing the audio until it runs out of dynamic range and then clips hard. The iPhone mic shows no compression at all across the 20-20K Hz frequency range until you go over 99 dBSPL and then it clips. Not as good as a professional sound level meter but pretty darn good anyway.

For what we are trying to measure, the iPhone mic paired with an app like the free dB Decibel Meter is accurate enough. It's comparable to a Level 2 sound level meter.
 

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I don't think you're giving the microphone in the iPhone enough credit. Paired with an app like dB Decibel Meter, it is fairly accurate.

The iPhone microphone does not operate in a narrow frequency range. As a omnidirectional MEMS microphone, it has flat frequency response down to 50-60 Hz and then rolls off about 15 dB down to about 30 Hz. It's table-flat up to 10K Hz and depending on the model can remain flat up to about 15K Hz. With the app, the frequency response curve is calibrated with a Nor140 high-precision decibel meter so the low and high end roll-offs are corrected.

A sound level mic should handle some fairly loud sounds without compressing the audio until it runs out of dynamic range and then clips hard. The iPhone mic shows no compression at all across the 20-20K Hz frequency range until you go over 99 dBSPL and then it clips. Not as good as a professional sound level meter but pretty darn good anyway.

For what we are trying to measure, the iPhone mic paired with an app like the free dB Decibel Meter is accurate enough. It's comparable to a Level 2 sound level meter.
It depends on the model of Iphone to be honest Apple changes their almost very generation, but I actually had a full breakdown on the frequency response
of various smartphones and microphones from old land-line phones too studio microphone lime the Shure SM52 but decided It was getting to heavy handed. XD

But it was a two-fold issue the frequency response was one part and the actual size of diaphragm of the iphones microphone means sounds farther
away may not be picked up.


That said I still don't think the Iphone has a 20-20K frequency range, maybe 100hz to 12Khz but I've not found any documentation actually
supporting the range of the later gen Iphones.
 

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I don't think you're giving the microphone in the iPhone enough credit. Paired with an app like dB Decibel Meter, it is fairly accurate.

The iPhone microphone does not operate in a narrow frequency range. As a omnidirectional MEMS microphone, it has flat frequency response down to 50-60 Hz and then rolls off about 15 dB down to about 30 Hz. It's table-flat up to 10K Hz and depending on the model can remain flat up to about 15K Hz. With the app, the frequency response curve is calibrated with a Nor140 high-precision decibel meter so the low and high end roll-offs are corrected.

A sound level mic should handle some fairly loud sounds without compressing the audio until it runs out of dynamic range and then clips hard. The iPhone mic shows no compression at all across the 20-20K Hz frequency range until you go over 99 dBSPL and then it clips. Not as good as a professional sound level meter but pretty darn good anyway.

For what we are trying to measure, the iPhone mic paired with an app like the free dB Decibel Meter is accurate enough. It's comparable to a Level 2 sound level meter.
I have compared DB Meter pro to a high quality meter and yes it is pretty accurate.

I also have an app called Spectrum. A really neat spectrum analyzer. Playing white noise through my BG Corp. speakers it shows a pretty flat spectrum. Not exactly a scientific test due to variables such as room acoustics etc. but good enough for my purposes.

The DB meter check was done with an iPhone 8. The spectrum analyzer with an 8, an 11 and now an SE II. The 11 and SE II seemed to do the best.

Anything past 10K or so are mostly harmonics and not likely very audible for anyone past 40.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It's not iPhone, it's an S9 Android (much better but that's for a different post...throws grenade and walks away ). At idle the phone mic picks up 53 DBs. DB level increases as outside noise increases. I had to have the A/C off or it would pick that up. Loud exhaust from other vehicles is picked up even at speed as you can see the DB meter move in correlation. It picks up the engine sound if I gun it and as we all know the stock engine sound is pretty quiet (I have ASC off). It appears to be picking up the difference. Now, it might not be measuring the exact DBs but relatively speaking it's showing useful data.
 

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I have compared DB Meter pro to a high quality meter and yes it is pretty accurate.

I also have an app called Spectrum. A really neat spectrum analyzer. Playing white noise through my BG Corp. speakers it shows a pretty flat spectrum. Not exactly a scientific test due to variables such as room acoustics etc. but good enough for my purposes.

The DB meter check was done with an iPhone 8. The spectrum analyzer with an 8, an 11 and now an SE II. The 11 and SE II seemed to do the best.

Anything past 10K or so are mostly harmonics and not likely very audible for anyone past 40.
I haven't played with that one but I tested out Spectroid a while back and it was pretty good, my own phone operates between 60hz-12 Khz.
It shows that it bottoms out at 30hz but even when I generate a tone at that frequency it doesn't pick it up. Haven't bothered to test
with my Shure recording microphone yet.

For fun though I did a sound test and can still hear frequencies around 17Khz but only turning 30 this year so couple more years
before it goes to crap I guess. Hah
 
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It depends on the model of Iphone to be honest Apple changes their almost very generation, but I actually had a full breakdown on the frequency response
of various smartphones and microphones from old land-line phones too studio microphone lime the Shure SM52 but decided It was getting to heavy handed. XD

But it was a two-fold issue the frequency response was one part and the actual size of diaphragm of the iphones microphone means sounds farther
away may not be picked up.


That said I still don't think the Iphone has a 20-20K frequency range, maybe 100hz to 12Khz but I've not found any documentation actually
supporting the range of the later gen Iphones.
 
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Oh nice they included the frequency range in the article, thank ya kindly sir.
 

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For what we do around here, an iPhone and dB app is more than adequate.
 
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For what we do around here, an iPhone and dB app is more than adequate.
Oh no question, I was just speculating on why the Iphone may not be picking up the noise
that the OP had reported.
 
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