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Discussion Starter #1
I placed an endo camera pointed at the larger bushing of the front lower control arm to see how much movement there was backing out of the driveway. To my surprise there was considerable movement just putting it in reverse or drive with the brakes on. Given the geometrical location of the bushing, this much movement under such a lite load would definitely cause noticeable alignment changes when driving. FYI, this is a 2018 non DAS Q50.

https://youtu.be/V0Jp_9rFfRg
 

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I have no "wandering" at all, in my 2018 AWD non DAS Q50. I have 23,000+ miles on her with lots of bumpy and hard cornering.

Judging from this I would believe you have a different issue. Where are you located? Which rims and tires? Spacers?
 

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I had a 2018 rental almost two years ago. Very basic model. I can't remember the last time that I drove a car that was that twitchy on-center. Required a high level of constant attention. Very tiring. I'll guess something was not right.
 

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I had a 2018 rental almost two years ago. Very basic model. I can't remember the last time that I drove a car that was that twitchy on-center. Required a high level of constant attention. Very tiring. I'll guess something was not right.
DAS? Tires. But yes, sorting something out like this can be problematic. What's causing his bushing to flex that much? That might be the underlying problem.
 

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DAS? Tires. But yes, sorting something out like this can be problematic. What's causing his bushing to flex that much? That might be the underlying problem.
Definitely not DAS. I have DAS and the car simply goes where it is pointed. Even self corrects somewhat for road crown, tramlining and crosswinds. I'm guessing tires or mis-alignment.
 
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Oh just noticed non DAS car. Mine is not DAS and is rock solid. Something is causing his bushing to deflect do much and must be the underlying problem. Tires or rim is my best guess. Not a lot of info in his post. Did it always do it? Did he hit a pothole? Miles on the car etc.
 

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Nissan is pretty famous for using cheaper bushing's in their FM platform cars, the transfer case bushings on the 370z and G37 come to mind as being a big problem
for them in the last generation.

I'd check for play in wheel when it's tires are off the ground and see if you can move the end-links or have any play in the suspension,
if you do bring it in and have the dealership replace the bushings.
 

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Ours wanders. Has from day one. In the test drive I just assumed I needed to get used to the drive by wire steering. I'm used to it now, it wanders. There's nothing wrong with the car. Tires? Maybe. I doubt it, and at the rate we're putting miles on it, I doubt I'll find out because we'll have a new one before it needs tires. Wife doesn't notice. To each his own.
 

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The video appears to show more forward/backward play of the bushing and less lateral movement but I do trust that OP felt the car was wandering because I also felt that quite a few times before. I thought it was due to the stock tires since when I switched to PS4S there wasn't any hint of unusual movement anymore. Then 2 years later, PS4S were done, had to switch to a different set of tires and I'm feeling the rear end kind of wanders again. It isn't bad by any stretch though and I rarely make corrections but I know it's there.
 

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Ours wanders. Has from day one. In the test drive I just assumed I needed to get used to the drive by wire steering. I'm used to it now, it wanders. There's nothing wrong with the car. Tires? Maybe. I doubt it, and at the rate we're putting miles on it, I doubt I'll find out because we'll have a new one before it needs tires. Wife doesn't notice. To each his own.
You said "drive by wire steering". That would infer that you have DAS. DAS does not wander. If yours does you need to have it checked out.

If you have what is referred to as electric steering, that is an electrically assisted steering. It is still a mechanical connection between the wheel and the wheels.
 

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The speaker or writer implies, and the listener or reader infers.



As far as wandering goes, I have only sensed that when the car is on the highway and is centering itself in the lane I'm in. Oh, it also seems to veer to the right when passing an exit lane.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
By wandering steering I mean tramlining. The movement you see in the beginning of the video is just from putting the car into reverse, drive and reverse again with brakes on, car not moving. I have seen another video on YouTube with the owner having numerous alignments done and the alignment never being the same. I believe the issue is the bushings themselves being way too soft. Fyi, the car is 2018 non DAS with 28k miles.
 

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You said "drive by wire steering". That would infer that you have DAS. DAS does not wander. If yours does you need to have it checked out.

If you have what is referred to as electric steering, that is an electrically assisted steering. It is still a mechanical connection between the wheel and the wheels.
Unless you can get DAS without the Proactive package, it doesn't have it. Regardless, staying centered in the lane isn't something that can be done without paying attention, for the few people on the road who actually care about or even notice such things. Is it bad? No. But ever since I stopped daily driving my old Mustang with a quick ratio manual rack, nothing has felt good to me. That includes some new performance oriented vehicles that cost a whole lot more than the Q, who's owners thought they handled on rails. I'm difficult to impress, and the steering of this car is like Novocaine to me- and the wander does feel exactly like other cars I've driven that had bushing issues. I'm only irritated enough with it to bitch about it, not to actually do something. I'm relatively certain that 98% of people who drive this car wouldn't notice.
 

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I get what you are saying. But tramlining on a relatively flat road should not happen. In previous older cars I had it was always a sign something in the suspension is worn. Regardless, I will get some more video from different points on the suspension to really see what is going on.
 

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I get what you are saying. But tramlining on a relatively flat road should not happen. In previous older cars I had it was always a sign something in the suspension is worn. Regardless, I will get some more video from different points on the suspension to really see what is going on.


Can you also do a video with the car moving forward? Mine has no DAS either but never really felt it wandering. Stock suspension has specific tolerance in terms of play. I know this Q isn't a sports car but I'd be interested to see how mine does.
 

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You said "drive by wire steering". That would infer that you have DAS. DAS does not wander. If yours does you need to have it checked out.

If you have what is referred to as electric steering, that is an electrically assisted steering. It is still a mechanical connection between the wheel and the wheels.

I don't understand. I can't find anything that links DBW with DAS. All I read is that DBW is electrically assisted, both in gas pedal and steering.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drive_by_wire
 

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I don't understand. I can't find anything that links DBW with DAS. All I read is that DBW is electrically assisted, both in gas pedal and steering.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drive_by_wire
Wikipedia? Really?

DBW means there is no mechanical connection between the input device and its target. Electrically assisted steering is just that. Assisted. The steering wheel is still connected to a rack and pinion mechanical system with electrical assist. Cut the wire and you can still steer the car. It just would be heavier. Or it can be with hydraulic assist or no assist at all. Your throttle pedal in the modern car has no physical connection between you and the actual throttle plate. That would be rightly called DBW. The DAS system also has no physical mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the steering rack (except for a clutch in case of failure).

The DBW throttle is a little more complicated than just opening the throttle plate. An extreme of this example is fly by wire. The inputs the pilot makes may bear little resemblance to what is actually happening to the rudder, elevator and ailerons. (see 737 MAX)
 
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Wikipedia? Really?

DBW means there is no mechanical connection between the input device and its target. Electrically assisted steering is just that. Assisted. The steering wheel is still connected to a rack and pinion mechanical system with electrical assist. Cut the wire and you can still steer the car. It just would be heavier. Or it can be with hydraulic assist or no assist at all. Your throttle pedal in the modern car has no physical connection between you and the actual throttle plate. That would be rightly called DBW. The DAS system also has no physical mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the steering rack (except for a clutch in case of failure).

The DBW throttle is a little more complicated than just opening the throttle plate. An extreme of this example is fly by wire. The inputs the pilot makes may bear little resemblance to what is actually happening to the rudder, elevator and ailerons. (see 737 MAX)

You're free to edit it if it's incorrect. I looked several places besides that BTW. The hate for Wikipedia is over the top around the internet.



Here's where I think I got confused. There is DAS for Driver Assist System and DAS for Infinit's Direct Adaptive Steering.



And DBW seems to be misused around the internet as true DBW would be similar to what you described airplanes use.'


So my next ignorant question would be does my Q50 have Direct Adaptive Steering or does that require the DAS package?




Quote: "The steer-by-wire system, which Infiniti calls Direct Adaptive Steering, comes with immediate and long-term benefits. Right now, it offers a quicker and more precise steering response, keeps vibrations from the road from annoying the driver, and improves the car’s active lane control system. Eventually, it will offer weight savings, reduce maintenance costs, and make designing autonomous cars a lot easier.


Steer-by-wire has been the norm in aviation for decades, and Infiniti is the first to bring it to market"


https://www.wired.com/2014/06/infiniti-q50-steer-by-wire/
 
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