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What's up Guys
It's been snowing in NY all week and my Q50 is covered in salt from the streets
I won't get a chance to wash it for another 2 weeks :( I'm just. worried about the paint job

What do you guys think will it damage the paint ?

Thanks : )
 

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What do you guys think will it damage the paint ?

Thanks : )
New car, new paint. Did you put a wax or sealant on it after you purchased it?

As long as you don't have any scratches in the protection layers, you should be O.K.

I do use a "Washless" car wash on my vehicles. When used with plush micro fiber towels I'm able to "wash" my car without any water (and in cold weather) and get the salt off the paint (the undercarriage is another story).
 
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New car, new paint. Did you put a wax or sealant on it after you purchased it?

As long as you don't have any scratches in the protection layers, you should be O.K.

I do use a "Washless" car wash on my vehicles. When used with plush micro fiber towels I'm able to "wash" my car without any water (and in cold weather) and get the salt off the paint (the undercarriage is another story).
That's exactly what I did when the G35 was new. Periodic wipe downs with an instant detailer/ good auto soap and some microfiber towels is key. Aside from the millions of stone chips on the lower panels from over 100,000 highway miles, the finish looks pretty good for such an old car. I am also a Zaino nut, so coats of wax that last a year help tremendously.:D
 

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What's up Guys
It's been snowing in NY all week and my Q50 is covered in salt from the streets
I won't get a chance to wash it for another 2 weeks :( I'm just. worried about the paint job

What do you guys think will it damage the paint ?

Thanks : )
Hey bro!
I have been detailing cars for over 18 years. Exotics and all.

Salt could be a big enemy if not taken care of properly.

Salt sticks to paint and is sharp like glass so a normal wash or spray of quick detail wont do the trick without leaving some scratches and embedding salt into your paint which can prematurely wear the gloss finish.

salt will also oxidize the metal and wheels.

after riding in the mess (salt covered car)
get a spray bottle of white vinegar water mix 75% vinegar 25% water.
spray the whole car down. ( you can leave it on as long as you want 20 minutes, over night a week it doesn't matter. It wont do any harm.

after it has neutralized the salt you can wash normally.

Final tip local car washes may used recycled water recycled water will contain tons of salt soo you will loose there overtime as well. Also they use the same soap, sponge, and towels on multiple cars.

I look at it this way yes car washes make tons of money, but so does McDonalds. Just cause they sell it. doesnt make it good for you.
 

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I got a lot of salt stains on my car too, snowed a week ago and the temperature where I've been has been fluctuating between 5*C to -6*C and that resulted my hose to be frozen so I couldn't wash my car for a few weeks now
 

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Hey bro!
I have been detailing cars for over 18 years. Exotics and all.

Salt could be a big enemy if not taken care of properly.

Salt sticks to paint and is sharp like glass so a normal wash or spray of quick detail wont do the trick without leaving some scratches and embedding salt into your paint which can prematurely wear the gloss finish.

salt will also oxidize the metal and wheels.

after riding in the mess (salt covered car)
get a spray bottle of white vinegar water mix 75% vinegar 25% water.
spray the whole car down. ( you can leave it on as long as you want 20 minutes, over night a week it doesn't matter. It wont do any harm.

after it has neutralized the salt you can wash normally.

Final tip local car washes may used recycled water recycled water will contain tons of salt soo you will loose there overtime as well. Also they use the same soap, sponge, and towels on multiple cars.

I look at it this way yes car washes make tons of money, but so does McDonalds. Just cause they sell it. doesnt make it good for you.
I did a lot of research (spent 3 hours at it) after I saw this post. I couldn't find one forum dedicated to car detailing that recommended this method. The only mentions I saw about using vinegar specifically mentioned that it was useful for stripping wax/sealant from paint to provide a clean surface for detaililng.

It will remove any wax that you had on your car. You'll def have to rewax after you use the vinegar.
Vinegar is an acid, and will definitely remove the wax. You will need to reapply wax in the area that you clean. After you get the dirt off with vinegar then you should clean the area with soap and water (to remove all traces of the vinegar), then apply wax in the area that you just cleaned. So if you're thinking that vinegar is a replacement for soap and water - the answer is no.
To give your car the magic acid bath, first wash your car with your normal car shampoo, rinse, and then use the distilled vinegar. Just wipe it on with a sponge, and rub it in. Do one section at a time. Let it sit 30 to 60 seconds, and then rinse. When you're done, wash the car again with car wash shampoo, and then rinse. By the way, vinegar will remove your wax, so be prepared to re-wax your car after the vinegar treatment.
Vinegar is acidic. It eats paint. If you don't water it down and/or you leave it on a long time, it will take a significant amount of paint off.
I'm not saying that you are wrong, I'm simply stating that I can't find any additional verification of this method. If, as information I have seen indicates, this does in fact strip (I know you said to use it diluted - but so have the sites that recommend it for stripping) paint protection, I would not recommend it unless you plan on re-applying wax or paint sealant.

I hope the poster of this information can provide additional verification. I researched this thoroughly hoping I could find someone else using this method because the application of vinegar to balance the PH level of the salt does make logical sense.

I can state that my method of using waterless car wash (note: I never recommended detailing spray) with THICK microfiber towels (there are many out there that are made for use with waterless car wash spray - the thicker microfiber traps contaminants so you don't scratch your car) has worked for me through 4 winters without scratching my paint (I have a special light that it used to detect scratches that you can't always see unaided - my paint is not scratched).
 

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I did a lot of research (spent 3 hours at it) after I saw this post. I couldn't find one forum dedicated to car detailing that recommended this method. The only mentions I saw about using vinegar specifically mentioned that it was useful for stripping wax/sealant from paint to provide a clean surface for detaililng.

I'm not saying that you are wrong, I'm simply stating that I can't find any additional verification of this method. If, as information I have seen indicates, this does in fact strip (I know you said to use it diluted - but so have the sites that recommend it for stripping) paint protection, I would not recommend it unless you plan on re-applying wax or paint sealant.

I hope the poster of this information can provide additional verification. I researched this thoroughly hoping I could find someone else using this method because the application of vinegar to balance the PH level of the salt does make logical sense.

I can state that my method of using waterless car wash (note: I never recommended detailing spray) with THICK microfiber towels (there are many out there that are made for use with waterless car wash spray - the thicker microfiber traps contaminants so you don't scratch your car) has worked for me through 4 winters without scratching my paint (I have a special light that it used to detect scratches that you can't always see unaided - my paint is not scratched).
What brand of waterless car wash?
 

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What brand of waterless car wash?
I've had good luck with Griot's Garage Spray-On Car Wash. They sell a "bundle" that includes the Spray and some of the thick MF towels I mentioned earlier.

Spray-On Car Wash Kit - Cleaners - Car Washing - Car Care - Griot's Garage

Often, I will follow this up with an application of Spray-On Wax to give the finish that extra pop (plus it provides some additional protection).

Recently, I received a free sample from autogeek.net (it was one of those deals where you got a free product if you spent over a certain amount) of their Pinnacle Liquid Crystal Waterless Wash Concentrate with Carnauba. I have used this as well and have like the results. A lot. Plus with the wax included, it saves a step. I haven't used it enough to really make it definitive, but right now I would say that when the Griot's runs out, I will probably replace it with this.

Pinnacle Liquid Crystal Waterless Wash Concentrate with Carnauba, waterless car wash, eco friendly car wash products

If you do decide to buy from autogeek, they also have a wide variety of Micro-fiber towels. I recommend something over 500 m/g2 for use with Spray Washes (the deep nap captures contaminants and keeps them from scratching the paint)

Microfiber Towels Comparison Chart

If you subscribe to their auto-care forum, they will send you a significant discount coupon. They also have a newsletter that offers discounts to subscribers only.
 
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I've always been a big fan of using paint sealants like Opti-Coat. especially for a brand new daily driven car you really care about. It's key to the paints life.
Don't disagree with you, but I'm not sure how you are relating this to the thread.

There are several things being discussed in the thread (and since you haven't quoted any of the previous entries, I'm not sure which you are replying to).

If you are replying to the original post about Salt, I agree that a paint sealant would protect the paint from the salt, but it doesn't address the follow-on question about removing the salt.

My understanding from what I have read is that the use of Vinegar would also remove paint sealants (although I'm not 100% sure of that).
 

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Opti-Coat

that is your solution

get the car opti-coated. The installer will clean the car(and remove the salt of course) polish away any scratches. And install the coating so its protected from the elements.

Salt comes off with regular car wash soaps. You should be able to blast it off with a pressure washer. No need to use something extreme like vinegar.
 

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They kill the roads up here with a ton of salt hence why I decided against driving mine in the winter. Although a high quality wax/sealant will greatly improve paint protection you should note that salt primarily does it damage from the inside out. My winter car (G35X) has an excellent coat of wax on it and for that reason I'm not worried about the paint being harmed from the snow/salt. I hit the car wash bay once a week and blast off as much as possible from the surface and in the wheel wells. I NEVER use the brush on may car as it always has debris of some sort on it and will scratch the paint. I'm more concerned about the harm of salt on the undercarriage/frame so I always do a high quality rust control application about a month before snow fall. I would never drive a car that I care about in the winter without having it undercoated.

So my reccomendation to you is similar to what others have said, get a good wax/sealant applied by a professional and also rust proofing if you havent already. Once that is done just visit the coin op for a good rinse about once a week.
 

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Rust from the inside should not be a problem for many years....and Infiniti has a five or six year warranty against such damage. I would be much more concerned about corrosive damage on the wheels from the salt.
 

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Hey SnowItch, we have the same two cars I have a 2015 Q50 and my wife a 2014 Equinox LTZ.

My Infinite is just a week old we had bad weather and it got dirty. Now I want to wash it and am just wanting to learn proper care to make the car brilliance last as long as possible.

I also have some waterless car wash from Costco, but have never used it. I always thought I'd rinse or presoak first???
 
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