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So Walmart must have finally exhausted their stock of Valvoline Modern Engine Oil in the 5W30 grade. I can no longer get it at a reasonable price, so my next oil change will be last with this formulation.

However, Valvoline has apparently incorporated this formulation into a new product call "Extended Protection Full Synthetic", and with the demise of Modern Engine likely due to its price point of $35-39 for a 5-qt jug, this version is being offered at 50% of the cost, due to recapturing some market share, perhaps?

Here's the marketing summary (see my point, in bold):
  • 10X Stronger thermal resistance than industry standards fights oil breakdown in harsh conditions
  • 50% Tougher wear defense than industry standards with additives to counter heat and engine strain
  • Fight deposits & sludge to keep your engine running like new with Dual Defense Additive Technology
  • Built for modern engines to offer max defense under the hood, even with the newest technologies
  • Maximize efficiency & fuel economy with friction modifiers that stop moving parts from touching
  • Meets the API SP classification protecting GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) engines from LSPI (Low Speed Pre-Ignition)
  • Award winning 5-quart bottle is easy to handle and comes with a precision pour spout and anti-glug tube for hassle-free oil changes
Anyways, see link:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Valvolin...-Synthetic-SAE-5W-30-Motor-Oil-5-QT/362333163

It's easy to spot, as it has the same color cap as the Modern Engine 5-qt jug & 1-qt bottle.
 
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Looks like a solid option - ILSAC GF-6A is the gold standard to look for.
 
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This is a win in the price category for sure. ..Especially if it meets the same or better specs.
 

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I bought a box of mobil1 from costco last month. That's with the newer spec that meets ilsac-gf 6a and api sp. We'll probably see 0w-16 hitting the shelves soon compliant with GF-6B.
 

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So Walmart must have finally exhausted their stock of Valvoline Modern Engine Oil in the 5W30 grade. I can no longer get it at a reasonable price, so my next oil change will be last with this formulation.

However, Valvoline has apparently incorporated this formulation into a new product call "Extended Protection Full Synthetic", and with the demise of Modern Engine likely due to its price point of $35-39 for a 5-qt jug, this version is being offered at 50% of the cost, due to recapturing some market share, perhaps?

Here's the marketing summary (see my point, in bold):
  • 10X Stronger thermal resistance than industry standards fights oil breakdown in harsh conditions
  • 50% Tougher wear defense than industry standards with additives to counter heat and engine strain
  • Fight deposits & sludge to keep your engine running like new with Dual Defense Additive Technology
  • Built for modern engines to offer max defense under the hood, even with the newest technologies
  • Maximize efficiency & fuel economy with friction modifiers that stop moving parts from touching
  • Meets the API SP classification protecting GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) engines from LSPI (Low Speed Pre-Ignition)
  • Award winning 5-quart bottle is easy to handle and comes with a precision pour spout and anti-glug tube for hassle-free oil changes
Anyways, see link:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Valvolin...-Synthetic-SAE-5W-30-Motor-Oil-5-QT/362333163

It's easy to spot, as it has the same color cap as the Modern Engine 5-qt jug & 1-qt bottle.
That's a good price. I "had" (still do) Castrol Edge 5-30 ready to go for my next oil change - until I couldn't get my drain plug out. :( Castrol calls their synthetic line "Advanced Full Synthetic". The term "extended" for Castrol seems to imply longer OCIs. The term "extended" for Valvoline seems to refer to additional protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The term "extended" for Valvoline seems to refer to additional protection.
My take-away from using the Modern Engine (ME) formulation is it does an outstanding job in controlling soot in the oil, which (soot) is one of the killers of turbo oil seals, and is managed by the dispersants in the oil. The oil never turns black, but rather is a deep honey color when I drop the oil at the 5k OCI.

I'm hoping that using the Valvoline Extended Protection doesn't change that.
 

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0W-16? What for?
It helps meet fuel mileage requirements. It's on par with most 0W-20 oils in the important areas. Barely lower KV100 values and basically equal HTHS numbers.

I wouldn't recommend using this oil since its lower weight than what's recommended.

Pretty much ANY 0W20 oil is fine for the VR30. They all have similar values and none of them is going to cause engine failure solely because you picked this oil vs that oil. Just change it at 5,000 miles and ACTUALLY CHECK your oil level occasionally.

If you run really hard, maybe step up to a 5W30 oil. Even still, if the oil temps stays under 240 degrees, 0W20 will be fine. Unless you're running WOT for minutes at a time, you're not getting anywhere near that temp on a street car, not even if you idle for an hour in 115 degree weather.
 
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My take-away from using the Modern Engine (ME) formulation is it does an outstanding job in controlling soot in the oil, which (soot) is one of the killers of turbo oil seals, and is managed by the dispersants in the oil. The oil never turns black, but rather is a deep honey color when I drop the oil at the 5k OCI.

I'm hoping that using the Valvoline Extended Protection doesn't change that.
The color of your oil has very little to do with soot. It's due partly to oxidation, partly to how the dispersants react to UV exposure from combustion events among many other things.

Making a decision about oil turning a certain color more quickly than another oil without any other determining factors is silly. It's certainly part of a way to make determinations about oil but it's a very small part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Making a decision about oil turning a certain color more quickly than another oil without any other determining factors is silly. It's certainly part of a way to make determinations about oil but it's a very small part.
My decisions about what oil to use are based on UOAs above all else. If you've owned a Q with the VR30 engine as long as I have, I've tried Castrol Edge, Pennzoil Platinum, and now Valvoline Modern Engine, and it has demonstrated the best wear metal results for my style of driving and drive cycle.

If my oil is showing up black in 1k miles, or starting to showing a milky composition, I could have a fuel dilution issue (i.e., faulty injector) to as extreme as a block porosity issue that is contaminating the oil that needs addressing, so yeah, I check my oil for not only proper level, but what color the oil is, too.
 

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I go by taste rather than color.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
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I go by taste rather than color.
lot's of people miss the point of that remark, lol.

btw, just so everyone understands, ALL OIL has dyes in it. the oil you pour out of the bottle is not actually honey colored naturally. its nearly 100% clear. if the additives themselves dont have color, the oil has color added to it to get to the pretty honey color people have come to expect to see.

also, color alone still has very little to do with anything. you could easily go 5,000 miles, have little to no appreciable fuel dilution, and still have black oil that is in fact 100% serviceable.

paying blackstone the extra $10 for the soot test would be worthwhile. might as well pony up for the TBN test too and make it a $50 total test. you would absolutely know what youre up against then.

at any rate, other than money, changing oil early never hurt anyone and it makes people at bitog cry so thats always fun.
 

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lot's of people miss the point of that remark, lol.

btw, just so everyone understands, ALL OIL has dyes in it. the oil you pour out of the bottle is not actually honey colored naturally. its nearly 100% clear. if the additives themselves dont have color, the oil has color added to it to get to the pretty honey color people have come to expect to see.

also, color alone still has very little to do with anything. you could easily go 5,000 miles, have little to no appreciable fuel dilution, and still have black oil that is in fact 100% serviceable.

paying blackstone the extra $10 for the soot test would be worthwhile. might as well pony up for the TBN test too and make it a $50 total test. you would absolutely know what youre up against then.

at any rate, other than money, changing oil early never hurt anyone and it makes people at bitog cry so thats always fun.
That's interesting. I know UV-fluorescent dyes are used for leak detection in motor oil but I haven't found any information about dyes used to color motor oil. Nor can I find any dyes referenced in motor oil manufacturer's MSDS. Please point me to a source where you found that motor oils have dye in them. I'd like to read it.
 
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... but I haven't found any information about dyes used to color motor oil. Nor can I find any dyes referenced in motor oil manufacturer's MSDS. Please point me to a source where you found that motor oils have dye in them. I'd like to read it.
My new '21 Audi w/3.0 TSFI requires a 0W20 viscosity oil with the VW508 00 spec.

I found a Motul Oil data sheet:

https://d23zpyj32c5wn3.cloudfront.net/images/product_descriptions/technical_data_sheets/83126/Specific_508_00_509_00_0W-20_(GB).pdf?1595840563

Specifically, on Page 2:
101671

Yup - a green oil! So even though I plan to do my own oil & filter changes ($1399 for Audi Care? No thanks...), I'll be using a VW 508 00-spec oil and OEM filter, for sure.
 
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So can I just look as far as weight and an API service of SP and call it done? FFS, why does this $h!t have to keep getting more and more complicated?
 

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That's interesting. I know UV-fluorescent dyes are used for leak detection in motor oil but I haven't found any information about dyes used to color motor oil. Nor can I find any dyes referenced in motor oil manufacturer's MSDS. Please point me to a source where you found that motor oils have dye in them. I'd like to read it.

well, off the top of my head, you can see royal purple's color. you can also see the redline uses reds, and shaeffers oil is kinda greenish blue.

the initial post is gone from the internet forever, even the wayback machine cant retrieve it, but the bitog archive has some of it.

Most oils are dyed "bronze" which we call Amber, because oils are expected (by most of the general public) to look bold and amber. Redline uses red and orange dyes to differentiate its products, GC and Schaeffer's use blue/green, and of course, Royal Purple uses a specialized red/blue dye combination. Most additives, right after reaction and processing, are clear. Bronze and/or red dyes are added to differentiate the additives. Sometimes the metals in certain additives, such as MoDTC and calcium and magnesium sulfonates, tend to darken the additive, so the above dyes are added to mask the darkening. ATF's and most PS fluids are dyed red to detect leaks. AC compressor fluids are dyed with a fluorescent dye so a blacklight source can be used detect leaks as well.
Notice I said component, not additive. Since it is a "non-functional" additive, we have to call it a component. On a per ounce basis, dyes cost about $0.85/ounce or about $0.03 per mL. However, the dye is so concentrated that barely one drop of dye will color a quart of oil, so overall costs for this component are actually low. Now in terms of additives, the mutlifunctional phosphorilated borons, used for AW and antioxidants and friction modification, probably come in second while Moly dithiocarbamtes come in third. Next would be the dispersants and detergents. Coming in fifth is probably Viscosity Index Improvers. In motor oils, the Detergent/Dispersant package has the highest concentration of all additives and on a fully formulated cost basis, these additives are the most costly components on a per quart basis.
 

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So can I just look as far as weight and an API service of SP and call it done? FFS, why does this $h!t have to keep getting more and more complicated?
yes, you can. add to that using a fram ultra XP7317 filter and whatever flavor of synthetic oil makes you happy, then change it every 5,000 miles. pull the dipstick every few fill ups or so and check oil level. youll be good to go.
 
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