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Finally able to get some photos of my 2017 Q50

Pretty much stock, only "updates" are:
  • 15% Ceramic Tint
  • LED light upgrade (interior, trunk, license plate)
  • Weathertech Floor Liners
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Murrieta, CA, USA
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Nice. It looks like something is hanging down a little on the DS front lower bumper lip?
 

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Man, NikonGuy is gonna a break down with his bumper sagging and then y'all telling him his tips look low and now something is hanging from the front. 🤣
 

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Nice. It looks like something is hanging down a little on the DS front lower bumper lip?
Yeah I noticed that after seeing the photos. It was a plastic front piece that had come off one side. I secured it and all is well now.
 
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Man, NikonGuy is gonna a break down with his bumper sagging and then y'all telling him his tips look low and now something is hanging from the front. 🤣
Lol! Sorry! I truly am trying to be helpful.
 
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Man, NikonGuy is gonna a break down with his bumper sagging and then y'all telling him his tips look low and now something is hanging from the front. 🤣
I appreciate the extra eyes :)
 

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Lol! Sorry! I truly am trying to be helpful.
Haha I know you are. I'm so OCD that now if my wife see something on my car that I may not like, she just doesn't tell me.

She used to tell me and then i'd obsess over it and i'd always say " I wish you just hadn't told me about it". Well, now she doesn't. lol
 

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Haha I know you are. I'm so OCD that now if my wife see something on my car that I may not like, she just doesn't tell me.

She used to tell me and then i'd obsess over it and i'd always say " I wish you just hadn't told me about it". Well, now she doesn't. lol
That's funny. Yeah, I hate washing my car because I always find some new blemish somewhere, every time!
 
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I'll contribute with a picture. I cleaned the "new" 2018 RS and the 14 Premium. The 14 is about to go to its new home.
IMG_9753.JPG
IMG_9755.JPG
 

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2020 Infiniti Q50S
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Finally finished installing it about an hour ago, it is pretty amazing. Fit and finish are bar none the best. Excellent customer service too, Kevin took the time to point out some parts of the instruction as he loaded the exhaust parts into my car.
And the welds, are some of the best work I've seen.
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SW New Hampshire
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Fast Intentions = jewelry

Top notch workmanship and technology in designing an exhaust system.

I took my Q out in 10 deg weather to go to the post office and get milk. I never get tired of the sound of my FI exhaust and the feel of power.
 
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Having done some welding inspections on high-pressure boiler tube repairs in my previous career, those welds aren't that good. While the beads looks consistent in shape, it's the colors of the beads that would concern me. Stainless steel gets its corrosion resistance from the addition of 10% or more of chromium. The chromium at the surface of the steel loves to bond with oxygen and form a protective layer of chromium oxide. This protects the iron in the steel from oxidation. The neat thing about stainless steel is if the surface gets scratched, the chromium quickly oxidizes and heals the surface again.

Seeing colors in the weld means that during the welding process, the chromium has migrated to the surface leaving a chromium-depleted region underneath. Ideally, the weld color should be about the same as the parent metal. You can see that in a portion of the weld in the first picture. In the area that is the hardest to access, you see the color go from metal, to straw, to red, and to blue. The darker the color, the more the corrosion resistance has been compromised. The colors look neat but they aren't good from a welding standpoint. You can see blue in the heat affected zone of the parent metal next to the weld in the second picture. The variation of colors in the weld in the second picture I would find very concerning.

A couple of causes of this are excessive heat and/or inadequate or turbulent inert shielding gas. Around the weld pool, the shielding gas excludes air to prevent oxidization. However, a hotter weld has a larger weld pool and needs longer to cool down. In this situation it’s possible the welder has advanced the torch before the pool has completely solidified, so letting oxygen in. In harder to access areas, turbulence of the inert gas can allow oxygen into the molten welding pool causing oxidation of the chromium. In either case, the chromium is being immediately oxidized before it can be incorporated back into the metal mix, leaving a chromium-depleted zone underneath. No chromium means the stainless steel isn't so stainless anymore and corrosion can occur.

Now, having said all that, I'm looking at the welds from a pressure tube repair standpoint. Weld integrity is critical when you're dealing with boiler tubes that are operating at around 1000 PSI. Not so much on exhaust piping. Keep an eye on the blue welds for areas of corrosion but they'll likely not be a problem.

Color in welds may look cool but it's an indication of poor welding IMHO.
 
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2020 Infiniti Q50S
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Thanks for killing my buzz 😅. But I get the jist of what you're saying. Thankfully it doesn't rain or snow much in California and is never subject to road salt so I'm not as concerned about corrosion as I might be in the Midwest or back east. I just know these welds are worlds better than the job that a few of the local muffler shops have done on my previous vehicle exhaust systems.
 

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Thanks for killing my buzz 😅. But I get the just of what you're saying. Thankfully it doesn't rain or snow much in California and is never subject to road salt so I'm not as concerned about corrosion as I might be in the Midwest or back east. I just know these welds are worlds better than the job that a few of the local muffler shops have done on my previous vehicle exhaust systems.
Sorry about that! I spent a lot of time inside boilers as a power plant manager in a paper mill. Like I said, my observations are based on pressure vessel and piping repair procedures which are a lot more strict than for someone welding exhaust tubing. If I saw that discoloration on a pressure weld, I'd have the weld ground out and redone. No doubt some fabricators purposely do that because of the colors.

A properly shielded weld should end up looking like this:

98161
 
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I was reading up on it a little, apparently the oxidation can be cleaned up post weld with something like pickling paste if corrosion is a concern. Though it sounds like quite the hazardous chemical so I likely won't attempt to do such cleanings anytime soon.
 

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I was reading up on it a little, apparently the oxidation can be cleaned up post weld with something like pickling paste if corrosion is a concern. Though it sounds like quite the hazardous chemical so I likely won't attempt to do such cleanings anytime soon.
Pickling stainless steel involves using nitric and hydrofluoric acid to remove a layer of metal down to where there is a homogenous mixture of chromium and iron again. You don't want to mess with those corrosives. I've passivated stainless steel heat exchanger internals with 42 Baume nitric acid (67%) and that stuff is no joke. Hydrofluoric acid is worse. I was in a totally enclosed hazmat suit with an internal air pack while using the nitric acid. For fun, I threw a regular nail in some 67% nitric acid and it dissolved in about a minute, giving off brownish-red nitrogen dioxide which is highly toxic.

I'd leave it be.
 

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Haha, I wasn't going to touch it, not fond of working with chemical that could dissolve body parts and possibly give me cancer.

Just out of curiosity, you also have the FI system, did yours not have the rainbow coloring?
 
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